Rocha

Congratulations to new PhD Kelly McClinton!

 

Congratulations to CASCI member Kelly McClinton for successfully defending her dissertation entitled “Computationally Modeling Roman Domestic Art and Architecture” on April 23rd 2021. Kelly was co-supervised by Luis Rocha and Bernard Frischer. She completed her PhD degree as a fellow of the NSF-NRT Interdisciplinary training in Complex networks and Systems. Dr. McClinton’s research investigates how computational models, including 3D reconstructions, mixed-media models, complex systems, and machine learning, present unique technological affordances in studying the fragmented material record of ancient Rome, focusing on domestic Roman art and architecture. In addition to Complex Networks and Systems, her dissertation contributes to the fields of virtual heritage, archaeology, and art history. Kelly is now the Assistant Director of the Virtual World Heritage Lab, and this fall, Kelly will be studying at the University of Oxford, and working on a project entitled “Elite Identity in Domestic Space in Rome. Architectural Change and Redecoration in Late Antique Houses” under the supervision of Professor Ine Jacobs… continue reading.

Uncovering the “master switches” of biochemical networks can explain the effects of drugs in the destruction of cancer cells

Researchers from our lab, in collaboration with the Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, and Northeastern University have developed a mathematical framework that increases our ability to explain and control biochemical systems, including those involved in disease.

In a paper featured on the cover of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Professor of Informatics Luis Rocha and Alexander Gates (who earned his Ph.D. in complex networks and systems from the Luddy School), introduce an effective graph that can capture nonlinear logical redundancy present in biochemical network regulation, signaling, and control.

Rion Correia (a member of the CSBC lab, who also earned his Ph.D. in complex networks and systems from the Luddy School and Xuan Wang, a current Ph.D. candidate, and member of the lab) are also working on the project. Together, the authors demonstrate the utility of the approach with computational models of human cancer cells, showing that the effective graph reveals why some cancer medications are more effective than others in killing breast cancer cells.

You can read the full details via the press releases below:

Luddy Press Release

Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência Press Release

You can read the article here:

https://www.pnas.org/content/118/12/e2022598118

*Those interested in contacting the authors should do so directly, via the links provided above.… continue reading.

We are hiring Posdoctoral Fellows!

The Center for Social and Biomedical Complexity (CSBC) at Indiana University Bloomington is accepting applications for one or more full-time non-tenure track postdoctoral fellows to conduct interdisciplinary research in Complex Networks and Systems applied to various social, ecological, biological, medicine and health problems. The expected start date for the appointments is February 2020.

Candidates interested in conducting research in urban community-environment systems, or network science methods to analyze and visualize information relevant for epilepsy and other chronic diseases are encouraged to apply. The appointments are full-time for 12 months, with potential to be extended an additional year subject to funding and satisfactory performance. We offer a competitive salary with generous benefits.

The postdocs will join a dynamic and interdisciplinary team that includes systems scientists, biologists, computer scientists, and social scientists. The postdocs will work with Prof. Luis M Rocha and Prof. Johan Bollen.

Basic Qualifications: A PhD is required in Complex Systems, Network Science, Computer or Computational Science, Computational Biology, Applied Mathematics, Physics, Statistics, Artificial Intelligence or related field; a strong background in analysis and modeling of complex systems and networks; and solid programming skills necessary to handle big data and develop large scale simulations. ABD (all but dissertation) candidates may apply but will need the Ph.D. prior to start.

Applications received by January 29, 2020 will receive the fullest consideration. We will continue accepting applications until the positions are filled. Please review the application requirements and apply online. Questions may be sent to: luddyjob+postdoc-lr@indiana.edu or Professors Bollen and Rocha.

Indiana University is an equal employment and affirmative action employer and a provider of ADA services. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, ethnicity, color, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital status, national origin, disability status or … continue reading.

CSBC Awarded Project to develop Resilient Community-Environment Interactions in Urban Waterways

Prepared for Environmental Change LogoIn a collaboration with Professors Heather Reynolds (IU Biology) and Gabriel Filippelli (IUPUI, Center for Urban Health) of the Environmental Resilience Institute, CSBC Professors Bollen and Rocha were awarded a grant for project “A River Runs Through It: Restoring Biodiversity and Empowering Resilient Community-Environment Interactions in Urban Waterways.” This 2-year project is part  of the Prepared for Environmental Change (PfEC) Grand Challenge initiative at Indiana University.

The project integrates environmental, social, and complex adaptive systems sciences with stakeholder values to study an urban watershed in transition, developing strategies to enhance its resilience to shocks–both slow (i.e., environmental change) and rapid (i.e., sewage diversion). CSBC will develop a  socio-ecological complex adaptive system analysis to identify, visualize, and model the dynamic relationships between public and private stakeholders and watershed biophysical variables.… continue reading.

Research from our center shows women and elderly at higher risk of dangerous drug interactions

Drug interaction network

A new study led by researchers in our center has found that women and older adults who use multiple prescription drugs are significantly more likely to be prescribed pills whose combination produces dangerous side effects.

The analysis, conducted in the Brazilian health care system and recently published in the journal npj Digital Medicine, revealed a 60 percent increased risk for adverse drug reaction in women compared to men — and a 90 percent increased risk in cases of medicines whose interaction is known to produce dangerous reactions. In older people, one in every four people prescribed multiple medicines over age 55 received drugs with an interaction — reaching one in every three for ages 70 to 79.… continue reading.

Congratulations to Dr. Rion Brattig Correia!

Luis Rocha and Rion Brattig Correia

Congratulations to Rion Correia, who successfully defended his PhD dissertation on Prediction of Drug Interaction and Adverse Reactions, with data from Electronic Health Records, Clinical Reporting, Scientific Literature, and Social Media, using Complexity Science Methods. Dr. Correia’s research used network science, machine learning, and data science to uncover population-level associations of drugs and symptoms, useful for public health surveillance. His findings show that Social Media (Instagram and Twitter) and Electronic Health Records of an entire city in Southern Brazil, are very useful to reveal how the Drug interaction phenomenon varies across distinct groups. For instance, he identifying gender biases and specific communities of interest in chronic disease (e.g. Epilepsy and Depression). In addition to Complex Networks and Systems, his dissertation contributes to the fields of biomedical informatics and precision public health by leveraging heterogeneous data sources at multiple levels to understand population and individual pharmacology differences and other public health problems.… continue reading.